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Color, Pattern, Texture and Shape:

An Exhibition of works by Steven Alexander, Louise P. Sloane, and Heidi Spector

3/13/19

CCBAS, 2013 Acrylic paints and pastes on bent aluminum panel

CCBAS, 2013
Acrylic paints and pastes on bent aluminum panel
50 x 46 x 3/8 inches

Signed, titled and dated on the verso

VOICE 2, 2015 , Oil & acrylic on canvas 

VOICE 2, 2015 

Oil & acrylic on canvas 

42 x 30 inches

Steven Alexander, Poet XIV, 2016

Steven Alexander

Poet XIV, 2016

Oil and acrylic on canvas

72 x 48 inches

Signed and titled on the verso

Steven Alexander, Reverb 20, 2017

Steven Alexander

Reverb 20, 2017

Oil and acrylic on canvas

22 x 18 inches

Signed and titled on the verso

SOLD

Steven Alexander, Reverb 19, 2017

Steven Alexander

Reverb 19, 2017

Oil and acrylic on canvas

22 x 18 inches

Signed and titled on the verso

Steven Alexander, Transfer 1, 2012

Steven Alexander

Transfer 1, 2012

Oil and acrylic on linen

50 x 40 inches

Signed, and titled, on the verso

Steven Alexander, Voice 6, 2017

Steven Alexander

Voice 6, 2017

Oil and acrylic on canvas

36 x 42 inches

Signed and titled on the verso

Steven Alexander, Arcade 4, 2017

Steven Alexander

Arcade 4, 2017

Oil and acrylic on canvas

22 x 18 inches

Signed and titled on the verso

Steven Alexander, Arcade 8, 2018

Steven Alexander

Arcade 8, 2018

Oil and acrylic on linen

42 x 36 inches

Signed, titled on the verso

 

Louise P. Sloane, BB Red Square, 2018

Louise P. Sloane

BB Red Square, 2018

Acrylic paint and pastes on linen

42 x 42 inches

SOLD

Signed, titled and dated on the verso

Louise P. Sloane, Labor Day, 2018

Louise P. Sloane

Labor Day, 2018

Acrylic paint and pastes on linen

48 x 36 inches

Signed, titled and dated on the verso

Louise P. Sloane, VVPPO, 2015

Louise P. Sloane

VVPPO, 2015

Acrylic paint and pastes on aluminum panel

34 x 30 inches

Signed, titled and dated on verso

 

Louise P. Sloane, Fated 5, 2016

Louise P. Sloane

Fated 5, 2016

Acrylic paint and pastes on Aluminum Panel

40 x 36 inches

Signed, titled and dated on verso

Louise P. Sloane, Fated 7, 2016

Louise P. Sloane

Fated 7, 2016

Acrylic paint and pastes on aluminum panel

40 x 36 inches

signed, titled and dated on the verso

Louise P. Sloane, DRVBS, 2015

Louise P. Sloane

DRVBS, 2015

Acrylic paint and pastes on aluminum panel

26 x 24 inches

signed, titled and dated on the verso

SOLD

Heidi Spector, Boss' Life, 2018

Heidi Spector

Boss' Life, 2018

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

34 x 14 x 2 inches

Signed, titled and dated on the verso

Heidi Spector, My Clarity I, 2019

Heidi Spector

My Clarity I, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

12 x 12 x 2 inches

 

Heidi Spector, The Song Begins Again, 2019

Heidi Spector

The Song Begins Again, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

52 x 7 x 2 inches

Heidi Spector, My Clarity III, 2019

Heidi Spector

My Clarity III, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

12 x 12 x 2 inches

 

Heidi Spector, Deep In The Heart of Me I, 2019

Heidi Spector

Deep In The Heart of Me I, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

18 x 12 x 3 inches

 

Heidi Spector, Only Love Can Save the Day, 2019

Heidi Spector

Only Love Can Save the Day, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

24 x 72 x 2 inches

 

Heidi Spector, Deep In The Heart of Me II, 2019

Heidi Spector

Deep In The Heart of Me II, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

18 x 12 x 3 inches

Heidi Spector, Kisses Warm and Deep, 2019

Heidi Spector

Kisses Warm and Deep, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

60 x 3 x 3 inches

Heidi Spector, Our Love Song,, 2019

Heidi Spector

Our Love Song,, 2019

Liquitex with resin on Birch panel

12 x 12 x 12 inches

 

Press Release

Color, Pattern, Texture, and Shape:

An exhibition of works by Steven Alexander, Louise P. Sloane, and Heidi Spector

March 13 – April 14, 2019

 

Minimalism first appeared in NY in the early ’60s as a reaction to abstract expressionism.  This new wave of younger artists favored the cool over the dramatic and overly expressive tendencies of their predecessors.  These painters and sculptors avoided overt symbolism and emotional content but instead called attention to the materiality of their work. 

Minimalists sought to break down traditional notions of sculpture and to erase distinctions between painting and sculpture. In particular, they rejected the formalist dogma espoused by the critic Clement Greenberg that placed limitations on the art of painting and privileged artists who seemed to paint under his direction. The Minimalists' more democratic point of view was set out in writings as well as exhibitions by their leaders Sol LeWitt, Donald Judd, and Robert Morris.

Steven Alexander

What I think about is creating a presence that radiates out into the viewer's space, and that mirrors the viewer, so to speak. I make configurations that to my mind have some metaphorical relationship to the body, or to some physical, psychological, or cosmological condition. Color is the engine that animates everything.

I work the paintings horizontally, pouring the paint on and scraping it off with a cement trowel, building the surface slowly with multiple thin films of translucent color. This process allows me to inflect the color with undertones and overtones.

My hope for the painting is that it acts as a catalyst to dislodge the viewer’s imagination from its day-to-day pattern and that it creates a new place in the world for the viewer's consciousness to wonder, reflect, or just to be still. That's the regenerative power of painting.

Excerpts from Steven Alexander in conversation with Vered Lieb

 

Louise P. Sloane

 

“Louise P. Sloane is a painter whose distinctive production focuses primarily on color and light, materiality and texture. This became the matrix for the geometric configurations or symbols that she embedded into her paintings early on followed eventually by textual excerpts that ousted the signs. Deeply invested in modernist aesthetics, as most artists of her generation were, she continues to embrace formalism, albeit an expanded, looser concept of it. While she prefers that her imagery is seen as pattern and texture, Sloane is also very aware that traces of narrative are inevitably present.” 

“As part of her attraction to modernism, and in particular to minimalism, to Op art, geometric abstraction, Color Field painting and beyond—Donald Judd, Brice Marden, and Agnes Martin have been her touchstones—she has almost always based her composition on the grid and its variations. Her formats have been either square or rectangular and are oriented both vertically and horizontally. Often, the support is just off the square, enough to give the work a sense of tension and stretch. Her supports have also shifted between canvas, wood, Masonite, steel—whatever she finds to be best at the moment.”

From “In The Studio” an essay by Lilly Wei 
 

Heidi Spector

My work can be described as geometric minimalism composed of repetitive geometric configurations in acrylic with resin on birch panels, cubes, and rhombuses. I work with bold and vibrant candy-like colors that pulse and vibrate bringing certain shades to the forefront and others to the background. I create a grid to formulate the geometric compositions, which are ultimately inspired by musical rhythm and beats. The repetitive forms are meant to project a natural sense of optimism and joy informed by the techno beats and self-absorption of club life of eras past. My work is finished with resin, which provides a glass-like surface in which the viewer can reflect and participate in the synthesis and positive impact of color.  

My collection of geometric paintings and sculptures are greatly inspired by the American color field artists of the 1950s and 60s whom I consider my heroes and whose message of simplicity I wish to immortalize. These include Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, Gene Davis, Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and Frank Stella as well as hard-edged Canadian artists Jack Bush and Guido Molinari and British artist, Bridget Riley.

Spanierman Modern is very pleased to present the work of three artists all of whom work within the constraints of geometric minimalism: Steven Alexander, Louise P. Sloane, and Heidi Spector.  While all of them share an interest in color, form, texture, and shape, they employ very different approaches to accomplish their goals.